The shamers daughter pdf

 

    [PDF]EPUB The Shamer's Daughter (The Shamer Chronicles, #1) Ebook PDF, EPUB, KINDLE By Lene Kaaberb?l The Shamer's Daughter. Tamora Pierce, on Lene Kaaberbol's The Shamer's Daughter. Dina has unwillingly inherited Read Online The Shamer's Daughter (Shamer Chronicles ) pdf. The Shamer's Daughter (The Shamer. Chronicles, #1), Dina has unwillingly inherited her mother s gift the ability to elicit shamed confessions simply by looking.

    Author:JADA KLEINTOP
    Language:English, Spanish, Dutch
    Country:Tuvalu
    Genre:Children & Youth
    Pages:708
    Published (Last):08.03.2016
    ISBN:454-2-34658-631-9
    Distribution:Free* [*Registration needed]
    Uploaded by: CATHEY

    50167 downloads 146507 Views 31.33MB PDF Size Report


    The Shamers Daughter Pdf

    The Shamer's Daughter book. Read reviews from the world's largest community for readers. Dina has unwillingly inherited her mother's gift: the abilit. The first step into the thrilling middlegrade fantasy world of The Shamer Chronicles Dina has unwillingly inherited her mother's gift: the ability to. by Richard Wagamese. Sharon. Rain on the Dead (Sean Dillon, #21) by Jack Higgins. Vicki. The Shamer's Daughter (Shamer Chronicles, #1).

    Reviewed by: Dina struggles with her fate, believing it to be inextricably tied to her genetic inheritance: Davin, haunted by memories of earlier torture and plagued with insecurity about previous mistakes, takes on too much responsibility for the lives of everyone around him. Nico faces the biggest challenge of the three: As in the earlier novels, the mystery and tension are effectively heightened by frequently changing viewpoints: The connections between the protagonists and their seemingly divergent paths are made clearer through the interwoven stories; the details of each narrator's particular choices are overlaid with the universality of the pain and sacrifices in Kaaberbol's intricate fantasy world. Although readers will mourn the end of this powerful series, all of the prominent plot issues from the earlier novels are carefully resolved, and each character receives a proper send-off. It is to Kaaberbol's credit that the villains, complex and mysterious, will be missed as much as the heroic, though flawed, protagonists. Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide. Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves. Built on the Johns Hopkins University Campus.

    Project MUSE promotes the creation and dissemination of essential humanities and social science resources through collaboration with libraries, publishers, and scholars worldwide. Forged from a partnership between a university press and a library, Project MUSE is a trusted part of the academic and scholarly community it serves. Built on the Johns Hopkins University Campus.

    This website uses cookies to ensure you get the best experience on our website. Without cookies your experience may not be seamless. No institutional affiliation. LOG IN. My mother was a master at it. Exceedingly few of my childhood crimes went undetected -- she could always look right through me when she wanted to.

    And when she scolded me, she would always insist that I look her in the eye. The author didn't stress any magic in her book, rather saying Shamers had a "gift".

    Of course there are dragons, sword fights, beatings, excitement and danger -- all written, in my opinion, in an engaging style. The first paragraph had a hook. I wanted to know what happened and that surprised me. I had never heard of this series before and I was very sceptical. But I can truthfully say I was impressed with the book.

    Other than that, this book gave me a pleasant surprise. I enjoyed it. It wasn't dauntingly thick, the view of first-person made it easy to read and the story-line moved along fast. May 07, K rated it it was ok Shelves: I actually didn't dislike this book as much as the rating would imply; The Shamer's Daughter is a quick, fun read and the idea of the "Shamer", while not totally revolutionary, is fresh and engaging.

    But while The Shamer's Daughter is an enjoyable read, it suffers from a bland heroine and a shade of the "but I'm not like other girls" brand of sexism that I've come to loathe in middle grade and young adult fiction. Dina Tonnerre is the daughter of the Shamer, a woman who can look into the eyes of I actually didn't dislike this book as much as the rating would imply; The Shamer's Daughter is a quick, fun read and the idea of the "Shamer", while not totally revolutionary, is fresh and engaging.

    Dina Tonnerre is the daughter of the Shamer, a woman who can look into the eyes of anyone and know all their secrets, and who can make them feel all their shame. She's inherited her mother's powers, and as such she has no friends other than her sometimes insufferable family.

    The Shamer's Daughter

    Things are pretty okay at the outset of the book, then things start to go wrong and Dina finds herself caught in the midst of a gruesome murder and politics and also dragons. The story flows well, and is evenly-paced and interesting, though there's a lot of the characters sitting around and doing nothing. A fair amount of conflict is generated by Dina just kind of being an idiot, which is fair enough since she's a really scared ten-year-old, but is frustrating anyway.

    Dina herself is likable in some ways, but she's wise beyond her years which sometimes makes her feel less like a character and more like the author's mouthpiece. I failed to connect with any of the characters who peppered the story, though they were unique enough. I think part of the problem with the narrative was its brevity; Dina spent far too much time alone in her own head for me to get any feel for the secondary characters, and Dina herself was a rather flat character.

    The Shamer's daughter ( edition) | Open Library

    I do think there's plenty of room for growth in the sequels, so I have hope. The book does throw around a fair amount of gendered slurs which is pretty jarring in a book that reads like it's intended for children.

    I probably wouldn't mind so much if words other than "bitch" or "slut" were being used, but they aren't and that makes me, as an adult reader, pretty uncomfortable. I also found Dina's blaming of spoiled Cilla for her misfortunes pretty irritating. It's partially excusable because she's obviously an upset child and it's maybe meant as a flaw but really, can we blame the ruthless male antagonist for the stuff that is actually his fault and not a child?

    There's nothing in the book that really made me go "wow, that was gross" but there was an overall sense of unease with the way certain events were handled. Still, the book was fun enough and I'll be picking up the sequels from the library. Hopefully some of my issues with The Shamer's Daughter will be ameliorated as Dina grows as a character and the series grows more complex. This review also appears on: What a cool concept! The Shamer's Daughter follows eleven-year-old Dina, who is the daughter of something called a Shamer.

    Shamers' powers, which are inherited genetically, allow the Shamer to look anyone in the eye and force them to relive all of their shameful memories and confess their bad deeds. The Shamer's gift is rare and the few around, like Dina's mother, are called on to settle legal disputes. This turns south when she is called to prove a man guilty in the This review also appears on: This turns south when she is called to prove a man guilty in the matter of a royal murder - and the royal family doesn't like when she turns the blame on them.

    When I picked up The Shamer's Daughter at the library, I didn't know it was targeted at such a young audience. Since the main character is 11, I'm assuming that the target audience is probably I can understand a lot of the two-star reviews I'm seeing from fellow adults like myself, but I can see my younger self loving this book. It's one of those YA books that straddles the lines of the genre.

    There is legitimate danger, graphic descriptions, foul language, and all those edgy things that neonates love to feel mature in reading. However, the reason it wasn't too interesting to me as an adult was how simple characters and relationships were.

    Everyone Dina met was either a friend or a foe, and once someone was a friend, they were automatically a part of the "hero team" and a main character, no questions asked.

    Had to give it a three-star since I'm sure younger kids would love it, though it wasn't my cup of tea. I'd suggest passing it on to an advanced young reader who loves fantasy. Strengt taget var det vel ikke Cillas skyld, at jeg blev bidt i armen af den drage. Men man pirrer nysgerrigheden med det samme og det kan jeg kun sige er en stor fordel!

    Sproget er fantastisk, helt igennem. En personlig favorit er Nicodemus Ravens, som er arving til fyrstetronen i Dunark. Denne bog er et must for enhver fantasy elsker! Third time read: September - 9th of September. Sep 27, Kelsey rated it really liked it Recommends it for: Young fantasy readers, adults who don't mind reading children's books. If you don't want to see them, you probably shouldn't read this The things I liked: I find that children's authors tend to gloss over or completely ignore these aspects of human life, and it often makes no sense, considering that many children's fantasy stories are set in Middle Ages-esque villages and castles, which gasp didn't have indoor plumbing, and in which people gasp slaughtered animals and gasp didn't necessarily have nice manners.

    Kaaberbol's characters bleed, pee, and puke, and it makes them seem more human. I found it especially touching when view spoiler [Rose asked Dina to look at her in order to make her Rose feel that she was brave enough to escape Dunark and her troubled life there hide spoiler ]. I thought it added a nice level of depth to Dina's character, and it makes you wonder if Dina's mother ever used her power the same way, and if she even knows that it's possible.

    It hints that Dina may have more command of her Shamer's eyes than her skilled mother even does, and I hope that I get a glimpse of a grown-up Dina in full command of her power later in the series. What I really liked is that this story manages to have a strong female lead but not stray into "Rah-rah girl power" territory. Females have weapons; females are expected to do difficult and dirty work; females don't gasp and shriek at the sight of blood; females are intelligent, but you don't get the sense that this is supposed to be an extraordinary thing.

    Dina doesn't go through any type of "transformation" from ignorant, innocent farm girl to brave, my-gender-be-damned warrior--you just get the sense that she was, is, and will always be Dina, and that it's never occurred to her to do or not do certain things because she's a girl. That's the best kind of "girl power," in my opinion--not giving girls the sense that being brave, smart, and capable requires some kind of extraordinary effort to be "different" from other girls, but the sense that girls just are all of those things and more.

    The things I liked less: I feel like this was probably just the result of translation, but I was kind of taken aback during the scene in which one of the characters says it. I mean, the scene isn't a nice one, and yes, one would imagine that that kind of language would be used, but here we are, in a book that doesn't even use words like "crap," which I believe most people find less offensive than "slut," and suddenly one of the characters busts out with "slut.

    So, overall, this book is a nice one for kids, but be prepared to have a discussion about why we don't use that word in polite company if you're intending to give the book to a child.

    Yes, she's a little girl, but after some of the things that have happened to her, you would think she would need a little bit more to go on than, "I just felt like I could trust so-and-so. Clearly, there are bad people out there who are so evil that they have no conscience and can resist Shamer's eyes. Then, when she's thrown into a cell with Nico, she trusts him because her mother, with her Shamer's eyes, says that he is innocent.

    Have we not just established that Shamer's eyes aren't infallible? This isn't exactly a criticism, then, but more of a caution for adult readers just coming to the series.

    Things are going to move right along, the dialogue is going to be straightforward, and the important parts of the story are going to be a touch predictable. Your heart probably isn't going to pound with the suspense of it all, because you have a sense of what will and won't happen in a children's book.

    That said, it's still interesting, and, like I mentioned earlier, it doesn't gloss over the "icky" parts, so it's a bit more PG than your average children's story. Overall, I would recommend this story to kids and adults alike, and I intend to either find or download the rest of the series which seems to be a bit hard to find Nov 03, Robin rated it it was amazing Shelves: How did this book get past me when it was first published?

    The premise is described in the trailer for the novel: Dina is the daughter of the Village Shamer, a woman who can read the truth in people through looking at their eyes. Quite literally, when you are looking into her eyes, you are rendered incapable of lying, and she can see how you really think, feel, and behave, even in your most private moments. This makes her very useful for law enforcement, obviously, but also tremendously unpopula How did this book get past me when it was first published?

    This makes her very useful for law enforcement, obviously, but also tremendously unpopular in social settings for equally obvious reasons. Our heroine, the daughter, has inherited the gift herself, though at the beginning of the novel it sure does not FEEL like a gift to her. Hard to have friends and be part of the group when you have this "gift. Then there's mystery, and people striving for power, and real dragons who are nasty and relentlessly awful, and a hero boy Nico who is also likable and flawed and who for once does NOT save the day for the girl.

    In fact, at one point, she rescues him. A little politics, some nasty fighting, a close-to-dying experience or two, and a bit of female friendship, and this book has everything a middle school kid, male or female might want.

    Loved that this did not end on a rosey happy syrupy sweet note. I was amazed to find that this was originally written in Danish, and translated into English: It flows beautifully. Note to parents: They are used by nasty people behaving in mean ways, and are clearly not encouraged to be used by the readers. But they are in there. Also, the villain is a true sociopath and his mother, Lady Death, creeped me out. But their motivation for what they do in the book is utterly realistic and believable.

    I found the mother to be a character truly worth emulating: Dina begins to see this as the book progresses, and also finds that the burdonsome gift she has inherited might also be a blessing as well. The Widow Petri is much the same way: I'm just amazed I did not brush up against this series before now, as it was published in Looking forward to finding the sequels.

    Mar 19, Maria Estrada rated it it was amazing. This book was amazing! I enjoyed the depiction of magical realism, magic, and dragons.

    The unique use of dragons in the story got me hooked. I thoroughly enjoyed going on this journey with Dina and Nico , and I can't wait to read the rest of the series. I am passing t This book was amazing!

    I am passing this book along to my son 9 , who I know will love the series. Also, according to the author, the e-books are coming! Jan 17, Trish rated it liked it. Sarah picked this book out and I decided to read it since she didn't. I knew I could read it in less than a day and then tell her if it was worth it or not.

    Now I know that she would most likely enjoy it. I'm glad that here is a new series for her to read What I like about the book is how the reader grows with the characters.

    In the beginning, there's so much mystery and childlike innocence about the world and not knowing what is going on. As t Sarah picked this book out and I decided to read it since she didn't. As the story progresses, the characters find in themselves the ability to overcome their weaknesses and their weaknesses turn out to be their strengths. The only flaws I noticed about the book is the use of the word "pee". It's supposed to be set in some kind of medieval time with knights and castles and then the word appears and throws you back on your couch in the real world.

    It's good, however, for comic relief. Also, I noticed that having the main character pass out from exhaustion or illness is a good way to move the time line of the story along.

    As they encounter threats, they learn the importance of being brave and using their strengths responsibly. It's a hundred small ones. It is not either-or. It's both-and.

    Follow the Author

    A feature film based on The Shamer Chronicles is presently under development. Currently, she lives in Sark, UK, where she continues to write for young adults between the ages of ten and fourteen.

    H Adventure Series. London: Tempo,

    Similar articles


    Copyright © 2019 backmocadiwus.gq. All rights reserved.